Saturday, July 14, 2007

How long will Cesc stay for? Longer than Flamini?

Two central midfielders have announced they're staying at the club in the last few days: one who wanted to go and ended up staying; another who, it seems, came much closer than many of us thought to leaving, and then stayed.

The first is Matthieu Flamini, who hasn't featured in the team for some time now, although whether this has been due to injury or Arsene deliberately excluding him isn't clear. I've always had a soft sport for the Flamster, mainly borne from his whole-hearted efforts for the team and his role in the Champions League run.

Whether he can ever make it as a really top-class central midfielder remains doubtful. Coupled with Gilberto in the centre of midfiled, Flamini has looked solid, yet with Cesc next to him, the two can appear a little lightweight. Overall, however, I'm glad he's staying, especially if he's now willing to fill in around the pitch, and not just in his favoured central midfield berth. I do wonder, though, if his decision to stay is based upon a lack of alternatives, or a real desire to stay at the club.

And so on to the other midfielder who we'll have for at least one more season: Cesc. His comments have, over the last few weeks, not overly impressed me, whether it be his commitment to Arsene, not Arsenal, or his coquettish statements about playing in Spain.

Of course, he has no real obligation to stay at the club past this season; well, other than the fact he's become the player he is due to the opportunities the club has given him from an extremely early age, and the almost unconditional support from the manager and Arsenal fans. Just that.

Here's what he had to say about a potential move to Madrid:

"I'm very grateful to Real and it is an honour that such a great club is interested in me.

"But after the departure of Thierry Henry to Barcelona I couldn't leave Arsenal in the lurch."

"I have total confidence in Arsene Wenger that he will sign a new deal."

"I spoke to Real's president Ramon Calderon and sport director Predrag Mijatovic and they are spectacular people.

"It was very satisfying to listen to them as Real Madrid is a great club but I have decided to stay at Arsenal.

"I had a long talk with Wenger. He is someone I can talk to about anything."

So, he's already started flirting with Madrid, and he's not even 21. Great.

I never expected Cesc to stay for the entirety of his 8 year contract, and I don't begrudge him a move back to Spain at some point in the future. I'm glad that he's also recognising how much trouble the club would be in if he were to leave now.

But I just wish our players would not make statements to the effect of: 'well, I won't move now, but I do quite like your club so I haven't completely closed my mind to the offer'. It's a bit like saying 'well, I like my wife, but you're quite good looking, so, if you ask again, I might go out with you next year'.

A piece of advice to the Arsenal PR department, if one actually exists. Please cut and paste this statement for every player who could, but doesn't leave due to interest from other clubs:

'I am aware of club x's interest, but I am an Arsenal player, under contract, and remain fully committed to the club'.

You see? Easy. No ambiguity in that statement.

I thought Cesc would stay until his mid-twenties, but it now seems that every summer henceforth will be a struggle to make him stay, especially if we don't start to challenge for silverware soon. I really hope he stays for as long as possible, because he's a truly fantastic player. I just hope he learns from the Vieira and Henry debacles, and doesn't flirt too openly too soon. It also makes me wonder - will Flamini outlast Cesc at the club?

9 comments:

well-endowed gooner said...

Goonerboy, after many years of marriage, you wake up and scream your bloody throat hoarse. The reason? Well, you realise that after X amount of years, your wife's slowly devolved into a slightly less attractive version of your mother-in-law. Granted, Arsenal's a bit sexier, but you get the picture.

Now, let's say Angelina Jolie suddenly shows up on your front doorstep and offers you hot, animal sex for all the rest of your days... you'd have to think about it, wouldn't you?

1st boy, by the way.

And I have big balls.

Goonerboy said...

My marriage analogy is admittedly not borne from experience, I must say.

Anonymous said...

It would not be a disaster for Arsenal if Cesc were to leave the club this season, or in the near future.

The squad would simply adapt without him - as it has whenever other major players have left the club in the past - and continue to thrive.

More importantly, the squad already contains players who could provide the necessary creativity in a central midfield position - Rosicky, Hleb, Denilson, even possibly Diaby too.

The point is, as long as Arsene is at the club, he'll ensure that no matter who leaves, the team will continue to play Wengerball, and thrive at the same time.

well-endowed gooner said...

It would be a disaster, because we've built the side around him. We sold Vieira was that he impeded Cesc's development. We kept Gilberto because Cesc needs a defensive guardian. We've changed our style of play to accommodate him (it's not as direct). So, if we lose Cesc, does that mean our years of transition were for nought?

Furthermore, I don't understand why no one's commenting about these constant references to my testicles. I've been posting on three different blogs (gunnerblog, goodplaya, goonerboy) for about three hours now, and no one's made even one remark about them. I'm clearly unhinged and obsessed about my gentilia. Doesn't that bother anyone?

By the way, I carry a pocket mirror so I can admire my scrotum at every angle. It's so hairy I can braid it.

little willy gooner said...

well-endowed gooner: I just threw up by breakfast over the computer screen. Your constant testicle-related talk sickens me, you naughty, naughty boy.

Anon 1 said...

'he has no real obligation to stay at the club beyond this season'....I think the 8 year deal he just signed should offer some indication about where his obligations lie

Anonymous said...

Wenger doesn't seem to be worried and he knows Cesc better than any of us do.

Anonymous said...

eral Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s eral Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at eral Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum. Valley of the Fallen mausoleum. is now lying in state ateral Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.the El Pardo P5969alace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.

Anonymous said...

eral Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s eral Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at eral Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum. Valley of the Fallen mausoleum. is now lying in state ateral Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.
Forgiveness
The Prime Minister, Carlos Arias Navarro, his voice trembling with emotion, announced the death at 1000 local time on radio.
He said that on his deathbed General Franco had asked his enemies to forgive him.
“I ask pardon of all my enemies, as I pardon with all my heart all those who declared themselves my enemy, although I did not consider them to be so,” the general had said.
He also asked the Spanish people to remain loyal to Prince Juan Carlos, his designated successor who will be sworn in as king tomorrow.
In a veiled warning to resist separatist movements such as the Basque nationalist group ETA, he advised the nation to “keep the lands of Spain united”.
General Franco successfully led the Nationalist armies against the Loyalists during the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, with support from Hitler’s Germany and Italy under Mussolini.
Franco allowed Hitler to use Spain’s naval bases during World War II, then declared Spain neutral in 1943 when it looked like the Allies would win.
Under Franco Spain has enjoyed stability and relative prosperity, especially after reforms introduced since 1959 that modernised administration and industry.
His regime has also been deeply reactionary, with political parties and non-government trade unions banned, and separatists and communists repressed.
World hopes for democracy
Leaders of European countries have been guarded in their reaction the dictator’s death and expressed hope that the new king would introduce modern democracy to Spain.
The European Commission expressed “sympathy and friendship for the people of Spain” and condolences to General Franco’s widow.
No western European nation will be sending a head of state to the funeral apart from Monaco.
But staunch supporters in South America, such as President Pinochet of Chile and Bolivia’s President Banzer will attend.
In Britain, Labour backbenchers are furious that the government is sending a representative - Lord Shepherd, the Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Lords - to the funeral. Stanley Newens, MP for Harlow, said the decision was “an affront to those who fought and died in the Civil War in Spain in the 1930s”.1975: Spanish dictator Franco dies
General Francisco Franco, who ruled Spain with an authoritarian hand for 39 years, has died at the age of 82.
He had been ill for five weeks and died early this morning at La Paz hospital, Madrid. Doctors said the cause of death was heart failure aggravated by peritonitis.
Flags all around the country are at half-mast and the general’s body is now lying in state at the El Pardo Palace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.the El Pardo P5969alace.
Franco, also know as the Generalissimo, will be buried next week at the Valley of the Fallen mausoleum.